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8bitfuture
8bitfuture:

Japanese construction giant eyeing up a space elevator.
Obayashi Corporation have announced an intention to have a space elevator operational by the year 2050. While acknowledging that current technology can’t build the 96,000 kilometer long cable, they say it’s only a matter of time before technology makes the idea possible.

Robotic cars powered by magnetic linear motors will carry people and cargo to a newly-built space station, at a fraction of the cost of rockets. It will take seven days to get there.
The company said the fantasy can now become a reality because of the development of carbon nanotechnology.
"The tensile strength is almost a hundred times stronger than steel cable so it’s possible," Mr Yoji Ishikawa, a research and development manager at Obayashi, said.

"Right now we can’t make the cable long enough. We can only make 3-centimetre-long nanotubes but we need much more… we think by 2030 we’ll be able to do it."

8bitfuture:

Japanese construction giant eyeing up a space elevator.

Obayashi Corporation have announced an intention to have a space elevator operational by the year 2050. While acknowledging that current technology can’t build the 96,000 kilometer long cable, they say it’s only a matter of time before technology makes the idea possible.

Robotic cars powered by magnetic linear motors will carry people and cargo to a newly-built space station, at a fraction of the cost of rockets. It will take seven days to get there.

The company said the fantasy can now become a reality because of the development of carbon nanotechnology.

"The tensile strength is almost a hundred times stronger than steel cable so it’s possible," Mr Yoji Ishikawa, a research and development manager at Obayashi, said.

"Right now we can’t make the cable long enough. We can only make 3-centimetre-long nanotubes but we need much more… we think by 2030 we’ll be able to do it."

thisistheverge
Imaginary vacations were a fixture of pop culture long before the virtual reality boom. Ian Cleary, a VP for Relevent — which helped develop both the travel pod and the Game of Thrones Oculus Rift experience — says this project was inspired partly by Total Recall. “Your brain is just a collection of signals that it gets from your sensory organs. Whether those inputs are real or fake, at the end of the day it kind of doesn’t matter. If we can replicate them faithfully enough through these mechanisms, your brain believes that you went to these places and did these things.”
futureoffilm
What’s going on in immersive storytelling is analogous to the truly independent American cinema of the 70s (or any of the other ‘New Waves’) where there was a lot of freedom and excitement to try new things. Art in general should always be searching for the new and undefined—immersive storytelling is providing that spark right now.

Jake Price

A new wave of creators are headed to NYFF to blur the lines of storytelling to span multiple platforms. Here’s what you need to know about Convergence

(via futureoffilm)
8bitfuture

8bitfuture:

Video: Nvidia recreates moon landing photographs.

In an effort to debunk conspiracy theories about the Apollo moon landings (and promote their new Maxwell graphics chip), Nvidia have released this video showing how they simulated the conditions on the moon to prove the photos are legitimate.

Moon-hoax believers say Armstrong’s photos are fake—because no stars are visible in the background and the lighting in the photos seems too good to be believable—but by painstakingly modeling the lighting conditions on the moon, NVidia engineers were able to match Armstrong’s photo almost perfectly.